Healthy volunteers

Get Paid to be part of Advancing Research!

FOMAT Medical Research is currently enrolling 

healthy volunteers in the SoCal region!




    Healthy volunteers

    Get Paid to be part of Advancing Research!

    FOMAT Medical Research is currently enrolling healthy volunteers in the SoCal region!




      Volunteer Today & Make a Difference Tomorrow

      FOMAT Medical Research is currently enrolling healthy volunteers in the SoCal region for:

      • Medical Devices - for example, sleep tracker watches and physical therapy devices. 
      • Vaccines - for example, Covid, Influenza, and RSV. 
      • Phase 1 - different treatment trials for different diseases and conditions.
      ***Depending on the study, the amount you will receive may vary.
      diversity

      FOMAT Medical Research is currently enrolling healthy volunteers in the SoCal region for:

      • Medical Devices - for example, sleep tracker watches and physical therapy devices. 
      • Vaccines - for example, Covid, Influenza, and RSV. 
      • Phase 1 - different treatment trials for different diseases and conditions.
      ***Depending on the study, the amount you will receive may vary.
      diversity

      Volunteer Today & Make a Difference Tomorrow

      Healthy

      What is a Healthy Volunteer?

      A healthy volunteer is someone with no known significant health problems who participates in research to test a new drug, device, or intervention.
      Healthy volunteers serve as controls for the patient groups. They are often matched with patients based on characteristics such as age, gender, or family relationship.
       We are looking for healthy volunteers just like you.

      What is a Healthy Volunteer?

      A healthy volunteer is someone with no known significant health problems who participates in research to test a new drug, device, or intervention.

      Healthy volunteers serve as controls for the patient groups. They are often matched with patients based on characteristics such as age, gender, or family relationship.

       We are looking for healthy volunteers just like you.

      Clinical Trial FAQs

      The length of a clinical trial varies depending on several factors, such as the type of illness and the type of medicine being researched. For example, if the study is researching a treatment for a chronic condition, participants’ progress on the trial may be tracked over a relatively long period of time. Studies of antibiotics on the other-hand conclude quickly as patients are typically treated on study for a few days only.

      The following items can be reimbursed for participants:

      • Travel expenses
      • Accommodations
      • Loss of income
      • Meals

      What kind of compensation can participants receive?

      Compensation, in regards to clinical trials, can take many forms:

      • Participants may receive monetary or other benefits for their participation in the study
      • If participants may receive a payment or other services if they suffer any harm from a clinical trial.

      Compensation is most common in Phase I trials with healthy volunteers. It is given to participants as recognition of their time and as an appreciation for their contribution to science.

       

      ***Depending on the study, the amount you will receive may vary.

      In some cases, taking part in a trial will not cost you or your insurance company anything. In other studies, the research team may bill your insurance company for drugs, devices, and services they provide. It is possible that your insurance company will not pay for some or all of the charges and you may receive a bill for those costs.

      The informed consent form will describe any costs to you in detail. If the information in the consent form is not clear, you may ask a member of the research team to explain any potential costs to you before signing the consent form.

      A protocol describes the rules to follow during the research. For example, a protocol states why it is important to study the research question and how the research team will try to answer the research question. A protocol also states how the research team will protect the health and wellbeing of the research volunteers. A protocol includes information on the study procedures, medications to be used, possible risks and benefits, possible adverse events, and data analysis methods.

      Personal lifestyle changes or restrictions during a clinical study depend on the protocol and the treatment in question. In some cases, some treatments may have more restrictions than others.

      A standard trial proceeds forward in several phases:

      1. A screening visit: During this visit, an informed consent document is reviewed with you, as well as your Medical History by the Investigational Staff.
      2. A baseline visit: When you attend this visit (the first step in your trial) you’ll receive your study medication, and the dosing will be reviewed with you. (This visit may be combined with the screening visit).
      3. Routine study visits  These are periodic visits done throughout the study to track an individual’s progress during a clinical trial. The study team may:
      • Test bloodwork
      • Administer the study drug
      • Perform a checkup on your condition.

      The end of the clinical trial does not mark the end of all communication between you and the research team. Once treatment is completed and the study is closed, participants should feel free to ask the trial staff what treatment they were getting. The study staff shares this information as soon as it is available, and they are allowed to do so. They will also share the clinical trial results when they become available.

      Informed consent is the process that gives information to people who are thinking about taking part in the research. After learning about the research, you should understand:

      • The purpose of the study.
      • The procedures involved in the study.
      • The possible benefits and risks of taking part in the study.
      • The rights of people who take part in the research.
      • That taking part in research is your choice.
      • Alternative treatments are available.
      • The right to be informed of any new information that may that might change your mind on continuing to participate.

      Informed consent is a process that helps you learn about the research study. After learning about the study, you will be able to ask the researcher or his/her staff questions. You should only agree to take part after you clearly understand the study and feel comfortable. You should take time to talk over your decision with your doctors, family, and friends. If you agree to take part, you will be asked to sign an “informed consent form.”

      We all have certain disease that impact our life or the life of a loved one. FOMAT helps you bring the fight to the problem by partnering up with our leading scientist. 

      This is way more than just data and research. It’s about building your community, sharing stories, asking questions, and making the world a healthier place! 

      With your help, we can make the world healthier for future generations.

      Get Paid to be part of Advancing Research! Sign Up Now!